Pussy Power Manifesto

1. We believe that the pussy is powerful.
2. We do not use the word to refer to someone as weak - e.g. he is a pussy or don't be a pussy.
4. We reclaim the responsibilities that comes along with pussy power.
5. We embrace our bush in whatever form we decide to present it in be it full, be it half, or be it a shape. But no matter what, we do not submit to the Waxing Industrial Complex.
If YOU have Pussy Power, never let a man or boy and most importantly another woman call another human a pussy in a hurtful or denigrating way.

SHARE YOUR PUSSY POWER STORY!
Do you have a story about the word?
When was a time you felt inspired by your pussy?
Or have you created an art piece or poem with the power of the pussy? Share it!
SUBMIT YOUR STORY.

sophiawallace:

Work from CLITERACY, 2012, Sophia Wallace.


(via What’s Going on With Pussy Riot, Explained | Mother Jones)

Favianna Rodriguez’s Poster for the Women Bashing Year - Happy International Women’s Day!

Artist and activist, Favianna Rodriguez, has created a wonderful pussy power set of posters for International Women’s Day. Thanks Favi! Here’s the link to the post and do check out all her other amazing artwork. 

ImASlut


Happy International Women’s Day to all my sisters out there!

Politicans and conservatives are waging an all out war on women, our bodies, our access to health, our right to birth control, and our right to free, accessible and safe abortion. Everywhere you turn, the right wing is attempting to further limit and hinder our access to our reproductive rights through anti-contraceptive measures.

Most recently, Rush Limbaugh said that women who use birth control are sluts. He went so far to say that women should have to post videos of themselves having sex if insurance companies have to cover birth control. You can read his full comments here.

This is just the latest of attacks on women, and I am fed up.

Patriarchy is destructive to society, it’s a form of violence against women, and there is no place for it in contemporary culture. We have to call it out when it happens.

I decided it was time for some slut positivity and some major ass kicking of these conservative, woman-hating men. 

Please share and disseminate. High res versions available here:

PoliticiansOffMyPootang

ItsMyPussy


The Muff March against ‘designer vagina’ surgery On Saturday morning, women will march down Harley Street to protest against the pornification of our private parts

Kate O'Brien and Sinead King, members of the Muffia, in London in 2009.
Kate O’Brien and Sinead King, members of the Muffia, in London in 2009. Photograph: Anna Gordon

"Keep your mitts off our muffs!" "I love my vagina!" "You’ve put my chuff in a huff!" These are some of the slogans of the Muff March taking place along London’s Harley Street Saturday morning. Its aim? To raise awareness of the increase in gynaecological cosmetic surgery – both on the NHS and in private clinics. The march, which has more than 300 supporters on Facebook, is organised by campaigning group UK Feminista and performance artists The Muffia, who dress up in nude bodysuits decorated with lavish pubic hair.

At its most modest, the Muff March is against the pornography-influenced obsession with removing pubic hair. But it’s also about protesting against the sort of surgery that makes you cross your legs. Typical procedures on offer include labiaplasty (trimming or removing the labia) and vaginal rejuvenation (tightening – usually referred to by “designer vagina”).

In the US this industry is worth $6.8m (£4.4m). In the UK the latest figures come from a 2009 report in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. It revealed that in 2008 the number of operations increased by 70% compared with the previous year: 1,118 labiaplasty operations on the NHS. (There were 669 in 2007 and 404 in 2006.) And that’s just the NHS. The Harley Medical Group reported over 5,000 inquiries about cosmetic gynaecology last year, 65% for labial reduction.

Professor Linda Cardozo of King’s College London recently warned of the risks of labiaplasty: permanent scarring, infections, bleeding and irritation. “The private sector is not recorded, audited or regulated. At least if you have it on the NHS you have to go through your GP and that’s a gatekeeper.” (Although one anonymous blogger writes on the NHS website: “I have flaps of skin everywhere and the whole thing is a total mess. I will never be able to be intimate again.”)

I recently heard of a woman GP very concerned by the number of girls in their mid-teens coming to her worried about what their genitals looked like: she thought it was becoming an issue largely because of the fashion for shaving off pubic hair, which made them more self-conscious. Of course, there are rare cases where there is an underlying medical reason for this surgery, but they are just that, extremely rare. A doctor who has treated women seeking labiaplasty told me: “When you examine them, they are completely normal.”

Some experts suggest this is a new form of body dysmorphic disorder. Others see it as a depressing but logical extension of the pornification of our culture. As it becomes more acceptable for young people to watch porn (where a “standardised” genital appearance is encouraged and many of the women have no pubic hair), so young women having their first sexual experiences are being measuring – and measuring themselves – against this weird porn “norm”. As one woman who has sought surgery says: “I browsed through one of my brother’s Playboys to see what the girls looked like. Some seemed to have very small or almost no labia.” In a world where not even your labia can ever be pretty enough, it’s time to fight back. Forward march, muffs!


Make Love Not Porn: Technology’s Hardcore Impact on Human Behavior
Hardcore pornography is becoming so ubiquitous on the web, it is shaping  and distorting the way many of today’s young men and women think about  sex and intimacy. Cindy Gallop discovered this through personal  experience. In a bold, honest book, she describes numerous examples of  porn-influenced behavior from the hilarious to the disturbing, both from  her own dating life and from readers of her groundbreaking website  MakeLoveNotPorn.com. "Make Love Not Porn" is part of the new TED Books series. TED Books are short digital books that present a single powerful idea.
(via Amazon.com: Make Love Not Porn: Technology’s Hardcore Impact on Human Behavior (TED Books) eBook: Cindy Gallop, Rodger Ruzanka : Kindle Store)

Make Love Not Porn: Technology’s Hardcore Impact on Human Behavior

Hardcore pornography is becoming so ubiquitous on the web, it is shaping and distorting the way many of today’s young men and women think about sex and intimacy. Cindy Gallop discovered this through personal experience. In a bold, honest book, she describes numerous examples of porn-influenced behavior from the hilarious to the disturbing, both from her own dating life and from readers of her groundbreaking website MakeLoveNotPorn.com.

"Make Love Not Porn" is part of the new TED Books series. TED Books are short digital books that present a single powerful idea.

(via Amazon.com: Make Love Not Porn: Technology’s Hardcore Impact on Human Behavior (TED Books) eBook: Cindy Gallop, Rodger Ruzanka : Kindle Store)


Make Love, Not Porn
MakeLoveNotPorn is not about judgement, or what is good vs  what is bad.  Sex is the area of human experience that embraces the  widest possible range of tastes. Everyone should be free to make up  their own mind about what they do and don’t like.
MakeLoveNotPorn is not anti-porn.  I like porn and watch it regularly myself.
MakeLoveNotPorn is simply intended to help inspire and  stimulate open, healthy conversations about sex and pornography, in  order to help inspire and stimulate more open, healthy and thoroughly  enjoyable sexual relationships.
(via Make Love Not Porn)

Make Love, Not Porn

  • MakeLoveNotPorn is not about judgement, or what is good vs what is bad. Sex is the area of human experience that embraces the widest possible range of tastes. Everyone should be free to make up their own mind about what they do and don’t like.
  • MakeLoveNotPorn is not anti-porn. I like porn and watch it regularly myself.
  • MakeLoveNotPorn is simply intended to help inspire and stimulate open, healthy conversations about sex and pornography, in order to help inspire and stimulate more open, healthy and thoroughly enjoyable sexual relationships.

(via Make Love Not Porn)


modernandmaterialthings:

Minimalist typographic movie posters.
I almost choked when I saw this: subtle but spot on.

modernandmaterialthings:

Minimalist typographic movie posters.

I almost choked when I saw this: subtle but spot on.


Flowering Vulva Ball Ornament for your holiday tree
from lunchboxes

Flowering Vulva Ball Ornament for your holiday tree

from lunchboxes


Pussy Policing

I don’t know how it happened that I ended up becoming the sex police, but isn’t it weird how the word “pussy” is the most sexy, awesome thing to say in one situation, and then five minutes later it can become an insult? I can’t say that I ever thought of it in terms of emancipation, but I did start asking my boyfriend not to use the word in vain. The current compromise involves him still blurting out “pussy” now and then, but he always looks over to me right after and says, “In a good way!!”


Thanksgiving

Today I am thankful for my parents who always challenged me to look more deeply at my words instead of just getting mad at me for cussing. I never got away with saying “pussy” as a teenager. Not because it’s a dirty word but because it would have been met with a lengthy discussion of misogyny in popular culture. 

submitted by lunchboxes


I felt unsettled and excited the first time I saw Jen Mazer’s tree trunk vagina STD project

The first time I saw Jen Mazer’s Etzchaim project, I was amazed by how vaginas can look so different - just like tree trunks. And then I saw how strong each trunk was - with all the twists and turns  - and the closer you look the more the two images blend together. 


beautiful vulva necklaces. 
Vice Style » News » VULVA LOVE LOVELY

beautiful vulva necklaces. 

Vice Style » News » VULVA LOVE LOVELY


The Story Behind my Pussy Power Necklace


Adriene made me a silver necklace that says PussyPower!

Hi! I’m Tricia Wang and I have a Great Pussy Power Story about my awesome friend Adriene Hughes who made me a silver Pussy Power necklace for my birthday! Adriene appreciates my attempts to reclaim this word so it’s time to tell the story of Pussy Power!

When I was in college, I became sick and infuriated when hearing men call other men “pussys” for not being a “real man.” But even more untolerable was hearing other women call other men “pussys” for failing at “manhood.”

Whenever I heard “pussy” used in such a condescending way, I would always say “excuse me?  those are my genitals you are referring to and my Pussy is POWERFUL, not weak.  So if you are going to de-masculinize a man, you can de-phallasize him, you can call him an ass asshole, you can call him a dick,  a bastard, but never give him the power of your pussy.”

After giving that speech once every week I decided something had to be done, women needed to reclaim the word “pussy”and in effect reclaim their own pussies. So I coined the term “pussy power kunt control.”  Pussy Power stuck while kunt control fell to the wayside.  I made buttons with the word “Pussy Power” and I passed it out to women who honored their pussies by referring to it in a celebratory way.

Adriene has known me for about 10 years now and I think she has heard me give that speech so many times.  Finally  I have a beautiful necklace for my birthday from one of my best friends!  thank you Adriene!  you TOO have the power of the Pussy!

IMG_3271

Pussy Power Manifesto

  1. The pussy is powerful
  2. The pussy should not be referred to as something that is weak. (e.g. he is weak so he is a pussy)
  3. The pussy should not be used as a derogatory term. (e.g. You are stupid, you are such a pussy.)
  4. The pussy is not dirty.
  5. The pussy is beautiful.

We will reclaim an identity that we allowed to be taken away from  and reclaim the responsibilities that comes along with it.  If YOU have Pussy Power, NEVER let a man or boy and most importantly another woman call another male a pussy in a hurtful or denigrating way.  Those are YOUR genitals.  PUSSY POWER!

arrow me day 8 @ My Pussy Power


Now on a separate note - Several friends commented on how they were so amazed I could post these photos about Adriene’s pussy power necklace gift for me openly on flickr. My birthday was back in April - and those few comments made me pause before posting this on my blog.  So here are my thoughts on this matter.

so when my friends told me that I was brave to openly post these- I ask them why exactly should I have been embarrassed or afraid?  They would say well you know you get google searched for jobs and grants and people might think that you are a liability or they may judge you before they get to meet you.  Academic colleagues have said well your students are going to find it and you’re never going to get tenured for posting this or what happens if your professor sees this online?  Well duh - I always googled people before I would interview, hire or even meet someone.  I would like to remind everyone that I was openly doing internet searches on potential dates and hirings back in the late 1900’s and early 2000’s before Google even existed ok?

So of COURSE I understand that this public internet posting will be potentially seen by my past, current and future colleagues and/or students.  But I don’t think I am doing anything wrong or embarrassing when I insist that women not allow the word “pussy” to be used in a derogatory way.   I am not using it in a nasty way - so how is that a liability? What I find offensive is when people remain quiet when something offensive is said.  And worse off I find it offensive when people judge others for unsubstantiated reasons.  To be anymore hush-hush with pussy feeds into larger schemas of patriarchy and misogyny.

I stand behind my attempts to un-dirty the word in a fashionable way.  For too long (not in all communities) women’s reproductive organs have been considered to be profane and unworthy of equal respect to the phallus.  The sexuality associated with vaginas have been seen as a threat and rituals are created to take away the power from their vaginas.  The menstrual cycles that women go through are seen as filthy - requiring physical separation of women from the community.  I find it problematic that although we have formal gender equality,  this is not always reflected in our vernacular.  The heavy association of the word “pussy” is too weighted on the side of the “nasty” or as lacking a cock which means lacking power.  So powerful and normalized is the cock that we celebrate and laugh at the word.  Even when a male is called a “cock” - like “he’s such a cock,” he’s a cock precisely because of his unwarranted use of power.   We laugh at jokes about “dicks” - such as Justin Timberlake’s Dick in a Box - but the word pussy is deemed as so nasty and weak that it can’t even be intellectualized or comedized (I made this word up)  in popular culture.  My point is that the way we speak of of genitals reflects underlying real world gender inequalities and tensions.

I simply will not be embarrassed by the names of female genitals  - And if this prevents me from being hired - then I certainly don’t belong at that organization, institution or company.  And if students can’t take me seriously after reading this, then they need to grow up.  Really.  and if Professors find this and are horrified then I am sure glad that they aren’t working with me.

When we make a claim to an identity, it’s not just about claiming rights or something abstract like belonging - but it’s about claiming responsibility to that identity.  So in claims that I make - like I claim I am Chinese-American or I claim that I am from the U.S. or that I live in Brooklyn or that I a female- then I take a responsibility in those claims to act and to practice what I claim.

And hopefully future colleagues who do come upon this will see that this is a sign of character - that I am not afraid to stand behind someone or something.  Now I am not some militant gender freak - so I feel no need to parade my thoughts or beat up people for calling men pussies.  Nor do I lack the sense to wear this necklace when I interview someone or when I am being interviewed - or at some funding meeting or my dissertation defense or even at any professional meetings.  I don’t believe in drawing unnecessary attention to myself and detracting from the larger goals or messages in professional situations because I do understand wearing this necklace entails the burden of explaining the message - which I embrace in moments when I want to teach people about pussy power.  BUT I will wear it when I find see fit and fashionable!   And if after reading this explanation and you still find my pussy power offensive, horrific or distasteful then it’s time to bring in some humor into your life and chillll out! Go turn on Prince and Mozart and watch some South Park.